A touch of glam from the 1930s

GIRL NEXT DOOR: Connie with one of her friends
GIRL NEXT DOOR: Connie with one of her friends
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MY aunt, Connie Jackson, may have lived an ordinary life.

But having been sent photographs of her at a young age, I feel she was an inspiration for her style and grace as a young woman with a working class upbringing.

WORKING LIVES: Connie Jackson, nee Hepworth on the left, with fellow workers at the Heckmondwike Manufacturing Co Ltd.

WORKING LIVES: Connie Jackson, nee Hepworth on the left, with fellow workers at the Heckmondwike Manufacturing Co Ltd.

Connie, nee Hepworth, was a weaver and one of the picture shows what she would have looked like at work.

It appears to be taken outside a mill at Heckmondwike Manufacturing Company, with my aunt standing in front of the name of the building.

Connie is wearing a long overall, yet underneath she is clearly wearing a fancy blouse and heeled shoes, with her work mates dressing similarly and around the same age.

But the same young Connie is dressed rather differently when she is captured on camera at the seaside.

HERE COME THE GIRLS: Ready for a night out in Cleepthorpes.

HERE COME THE GIRLS: Ready for a night out in Cleepthorpes.

There are a couple of photos of her with friends, probably all weavers like herself on their summer holidays.

I love the two daring outfits with long skirts and halter neckline tops, in spots and stripes.

These outfits are rather glamorous even for the 1930s and the tops very daring, especially as with this style they were possibly backless.

The outfits are probably home made, and while I do not expect they wore them around Heckmondwike, they would have been at the forefront of fashion.

GLAM ROCK: Connie with a friend at the seaside, probably Cleethorpes.

GLAM ROCK: Connie with a friend at the seaside, probably Cleethorpes.

This was the 1930s and the fashion was long and sleek, wearing skirts at mid-calf and longer for the evenings.

Connie’s hair was also stylishly short with a wave, but there would have been no wave makers to curl it or hair straightners back then, like we can quickly use every morning today.

They are wearing outfits which would not be out of place at a Hollywood party.

Yet these girls worked hard all year in the mills, saving up for materials to make clothes for their summer vacations, before returning to the hard labour that a weaver’s job would be.

In another photo of Connie, she is pictured during the war.

This would not have been a work outfit, but at the same time not for the beach either.

It was probably the early 1940s because of the style of the skirts, quite plain and simple, with one pleat at the front and shorter in style.

During World War II material was scarce, therefore less glamorous and more functional hardwearing clothing were needed.

But she still manages a little glam with her satin blouse, with slightly puffy shoulders and elastic waist.

Connie may have been a weaver for her day job, but the rest of the time she was a fashion leader of her time and must have stood out in the crowds of Heckmondwike.

I remember standing out a little myself at this young age!