Blossom led the way during fuel shortage

The junior church of Heckmondwike's Upper Chapel perform Cinderella.

The junior church of Heckmondwike's Upper Chapel perform Cinderella.

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Britain may have been gripped by a fuel crisis back in 1974, but according to the Guardian archives, it wasn’t stopping one Gomersal trader delivering to his customers.

Market gardener Walter Bedford of Lands Farm, Cliffe Lane, preferred horse power to cars anyway, and delivered his produce around Gomersal and Hunsworth on a horse and cart.

The Conservative and Labour posters in the windows of Gladys and Cyril Kell's home in Hightown Road, Cleckheaton.

The Conservative and Labour posters in the windows of Gladys and Cyril Kell's home in Hightown Road, Cleckheaton.

He told the Guardian: “I have always used horses to deliver my fruit and veg as I have found they are in many ways more useful than cars.

“For the past 14 years my wife Laura has delivered the produce. I was ill and she took over the deliveries. She got so used to the horses and the rounds that she has done it ever since.”
The horse was called Blossomand not only did she pull the delivery cart, but she had also pulled the dustcart for Mr Bedford on his contract with Spenborough Council.

Passers-by were puzzled by the mixed messages on these political posters which were being displayed on a house in Cleckheaton – urging people to vote both Labour and Conservative.

The posters were in the bedroom window at the Hightown Road home of the Deputy Mayor of Spenborough, Labour councillor Gladys Kell, and her husband Cyril, who was a Conservative supporter.

Laura Bedford with Blossom, which was used to deliver produce from their farm in Gomersal.

Laura Bedford with Blossom, which was used to deliver produce from their farm in Gomersal.

Gladys told the Guardian: “My husband and myself have conflicting views over politics. This time I agreed to him putting his point across alongside mine. I know it has caused great amusement with other residents around, but I feel that everyone should have a right to show their own opinion.”

The house also displayed two further Labour posters in a downstairs window.

“Obviously my husband’s posters have always been discretely out of the way, until this year,” added Gladys.

Christmas may have been well and truly over, but for youngsters at one Heckmondwike church the festivities were continuing.

The junior church of the Upper Chapel presented their hilarious pantomime, Cinderella, to sell out audiences. The thigh-slapping panto was written by Mr G Shackleton and Mrs H Shackleton.