Nostalgia: Two wheels and four!

MEN AT WORK Wilf Proudfoot watched the work on the M62 interchange at Chain Bar back in 1970.
MEN AT WORK Wilf Proudfoot watched the work on the M62 interchange at Chain Bar back in 1970.

Former Spen MP Wilf Proudfoot visited the scene of the new M62 back in September 1970 to watch the construction work – and predicted that the motorway would change Cleckheaton forever.

Mr Proudfoot was pictured by the Guardian photographer at the site of the joint motorway interchange at Chain Bar as part of a tour of the progress of the M62.

Roy Johnson and Peter Garthwaite prepare to set off on their 10,000 mile adventure.

Roy Johnson and Peter Garthwaite prepare to set off on their 10,000 mile adventure.

He saw the preliminary work on the 1,000ft wide three level interchange which would form the junction of two motorways, the M62 and the M606.

Mr Proudfoot was told that five million cubic yards of earth were removed in the five mile local stretch of the M62 between Hartshead Moor and Gildersome.

The work also included the construction of 18 bridges and 14 mine shafts had to be dealt with.
“It is quite dramatic to realise that when the motorway is completed, Cleckheaton people will be able to drive to Manchester in 35 minutes,” he said.

“The motorway is going to change this area completely.”

Also in 1970 a pair of intrepid cyclists were planning a 10,000 trip – and hopefully a place in history.

Roy Johnson, 25, of Heckmondwike, and his friend Peter Garthwaite, 26, were aiming to cycle from England all the way to Australia.

The feat had been achieved before, by an individual who took three years to complete it as it was part of a round the world trip, but the lads were hoping to become the first pair to do it.

They set off from Heckmondwike and cycled to Hull, catching a ferry to Holland.

Their journey would then take them to Germany, Austria, Yugoslavia, Greece, Turkey, Iran, Afghanistan, West Pakistan, and India.

From there they would fly to Burma and then cycle through Bangkok and into Malaya.

Another flight would take them from Singapore to Djakarta and then they would journey through the islands of Indonesia before arriving in Darwin.

They hoped to complete their mammoth feat by the following February to May.