Dad treated like ‘lump of meat’

George Wallace has begun a formal investigation into the care given to his father at Dewsbury District Hospital. (d08021204)
George Wallace has begun a formal investigation into the care given to his father at Dewsbury District Hospital. (d08021204)
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A FAMILY has spoken out about care for elderly patients at Dewsbury and District Hospital after a loved one was treated like a ‘lump of meat’.

George Wallace said his 93-year-old father was let down by staff at the hospital in the weeks leading up to his death. And the Birkenshaw man fears his father’s is not an isolated case.

Now the Mid Yorkshire Hospitals Trust is investigating his complaint.

Mr Wallace, 53, of Lynwood Close, said: “My father had short term memory issues but was treated like a lump of meat by certain staff.

“The needs of the elderly especially those who are disinclined to complain about their treatment are not being met at this hospital.”

His father, George Wallace Sr, also of Birkenshaw, went into hospital for several weeks but was only moved to the appropriate medical ward two days before he died on January 4.

He contracted a chest infection while in hospital which turned into pneumonia. On one day, Mr Wallace found his father shivering beside his bed wearing only a pyjama top and small blanket.

Mr Wallace said a physiotherapist refused to discharge his father until he was mobile, despite the family explaining he had had the same mobility problems for years.

He said that on the day of his father’s death, the family raised concerns about his breathing. At noon they were told the antibiotics ordered would not arrive until 10pm.

At 8pm, when they raised further concerns, they were told there was only one doctor that evening and Mr Wallace would be seen as soon as possible.

The trust’s associate nursing director Moya Emery said its priority was giving the best possible care to patients.

She said ward standards were regularly reviewed to improve services.

She said: “This includes checking that we meet key dignity standards which are an essential part of providing a positive patient experience. “Anything less is not good enough and I would like to apologise to Mr Wallace.”