Photographer Joel snaps up award

Joel Rouse, from Liversedge.
Joel Rouse, from Liversedge.

An esteemed Naval photographer is making waves in his line of work, picking up an award for his powerful shots of servicemen and veterans.

Royal Navy snapper Joel Rouse, serving with 42 Commando Royal Marines based in Plymouth, has won the Commandant General Royal Marines Prize and been highly commended for the Royal Navy Photographer of the Year and in a video category.

Dismounting the Guard''Today, the 24th June 2014, Plymouth based 42 Commando Royal Marines Dismounted the Guard at Buckingham Palace.''To honour the Royal Marines 350th Birthday, Plymouth based 42 Commando are conducting Public Duties in London providing guard at Buckingham Palace, St. James' Palace, Windsor Castle and the Tower of London.''Photographs by LA(Phot) Joel Rouse

Dismounting the Guard''Today, the 24th June 2014, Plymouth based 42 Commando Royal Marines Dismounted the Guard at Buckingham Palace.''To honour the Royal Marines 350th Birthday, Plymouth based 42 Commando are conducting Public Duties in London providing guard at Buckingham Palace, St. James' Palace, Windsor Castle and the Tower of London.''Photographs by LA(Phot) Joel Rouse

He will step aboard HMS Ocean in the River Thames on May 8 for an awards ceremony with fellow servicemen.

Before joining the forces Joel, 29, grew up in Bradford Road, Birstall, attending the village’s primary school and later Whitcliffe Mount in Cleckheaton.

Proud dad and stepmother Neil Rouse and Pauline Crookes, as well as Joel’s grandmother Enid Rouse, live in Liversedge.

Joel said: “It’s just a really good feeling, you’re quite proud of yourself that you’ve been successful in your category and got a little bit of recognition from the industry for the hard work that you’ve done.”

Frank Henry Cramp Recieves Green Beret''Pictures taken as Lt Col Richard Cantrill, 42 Commanding Officer, presented ex Royal Marine, Frank Henry Cramp, with a Green Beret.''The presentation took place at Shaugh Prior, Dartmoor, where the modern day Royal Marine recieves his coveted Green Beret after completing all 4 Commando tests.''Frank Henry Cramp left the Royal Marines in 1952 after serving as an instructor at the Commando School, Bickleigh, which is now home to 42 Commando. Upon leaving the Corps he returned all his kit and equipment, including his beret. The purpose of the presentation was so present him with a new beret.''Photographs by LA(Phot) Joel Rouse

Frank Henry Cramp Recieves Green Beret''Pictures taken as Lt Col Richard Cantrill, 42 Commanding Officer, presented ex Royal Marine, Frank Henry Cramp, with a Green Beret.''The presentation took place at Shaugh Prior, Dartmoor, where the modern day Royal Marine recieves his coveted Green Beret after completing all 4 Commando tests.''Frank Henry Cramp left the Royal Marines in 1952 after serving as an instructor at the Commando School, Bickleigh, which is now home to 42 Commando. Upon leaving the Corps he returned all his kit and equipment, including his beret. The purpose of the presentation was so present him with a new beret.''Photographs by LA(Phot) Joel Rouse

For Joel, the benefit of being a Royal Navy photographer is having to be a “Jack of all trades” and being plunged into any situation which comes.

“You’re a better all-round photographer. Your average photographer doesn’t get to sit in a helicopter or sit in a boat while people fire machine guns. You’ve got to be aware of your space.”

Three of Joel’s pictures won him the Commandant General Royal Marines Prize, which are printed alongside this article.

The first shot shows 42 Commando disjoining the guard at Buckingham Palace during the Royal Marines’ 350th birthday celebrations on June 24 last year.

PLYMOUTH Royal marines have been using the Surrey countryside to hone their fighting skills which make them part of one of the most effective fighting forces in the world. ''The Commandos of Juliet Company, 42 Commando, have been on exercise at the Army Training Centre, Pirbright, where they have been practicing their core skills. This included soldiering skills such as tactical movement and firing live ammunition.''The exercise, codenamed Precision Strike, was past of a wider training package which will see 42 Commando take over the mantle of Lead Commando Group in 2016. This will make them the UK�"s primary deployable amphibious fighting force; ready to operate throughout the world, in any environment.''Photographs by LA(Phot) Joel Rouse

PLYMOUTH Royal marines have been using the Surrey countryside to hone their fighting skills which make them part of one of the most effective fighting forces in the world. ''The Commandos of Juliet Company, 42 Commando, have been on exercise at the Army Training Centre, Pirbright, where they have been practicing their core skills. This included soldiering skills such as tactical movement and firing live ammunition.''The exercise, codenamed Precision Strike, was past of a wider training package which will see 42 Commando take over the mantle of Lead Commando Group in 2016. This will make them the UK�"s primary deployable amphibious fighting force; ready to operate throughout the world, in any environment.''Photographs by LA(Phot) Joel Rouse

The second is veteran Frank Henry Cramp being presented with a Green Beret at Shaugh Prior, Dartmoor, where the modern day Royal Marines receive the coveted hat after completing their four Commando tests.

Mr Cramp returned his uniform after leaving the Marines in 1952, and was honoured with a beret at the Dartmoor service.

The final picture is of a Commando during training exercises in the Surrey countryside.

Joel compares getting the perfect shot with a chef’s satisfaction when a good meal comes together. “You finish up, you eat it and you are satisfied – it’s the same with a photograph. It sums everything up and tells the tale in one photograph.”

But he said there are no idols he looks up to, simply taking inspiration from the many aspects of his work and under-the-radar snappers.

He is now looking forward to the awards ceremony in May. 
“I can’t wait,” he said. “It’s always nice when the photographers get together because we’re all so thinly-spread and work alone.”