Thank you – but I’m going to beat this

Sam Fisher, Bev Dransfield and Leanne Earley pictured with some of the dancers who took part in a mass Zumbathon which aimed to raise money for Bev's cancer treatment. d05061181

Sam Fisher, Bev Dransfield and Leanne Earley pictured with some of the dancers who took part in a mass Zumbathon which aimed to raise money for Bev's cancer treatment. d05061181

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A MUM of two who is battling cancer for the second time has thanked the community which has raised more than £36,000 for her treatment.

In November, Bev Dransfield received the heartbreaking news that she had been struck by breast cancer for the second time after beating the disease several years ago.

At Christmas, she flew to the Oasis of Healing Clinic, in Arizona, USA, for alternative therapy based on diet and nutrition supplemented by low doses of chemotherapy.

However the treatment was expensive – Bev and her husband Lee remortgaged their home – so hundreds of people got behind her by organising fundraising events.

Her struggle is all the more poignant as, following her first bout of cancer, Bev went on to raise thousands for charities through Pink Nights at Gomersal Cricket Club.

Speaking to the Spenborough Guardian from her Gomersal home, Bev, 42, said she was overwhelmed by the public’s response.

“I was petrified when I was diagnosed for the second time, but now I’m not. I’m going to win. I’m going to conquer this and I don’t live for today, but for 30 or 40 years from now,” she said

“I just want to say thank you to everyone who has helped raise money in any way.

“People who I have never met have donated their time and money and we are so grateful for it.

“When I was in America, every time I went on Facebook I was in tears reading what people were doing. I was amazed.”

They have staged a charity auction, a midnight walk, race nights, bucket collections, a cyclathon, a parachute jump, a tea party and, most recently a Zumbathon.

Next up is a 1960s, 70s and 80s disco held at the Whitcliffe Hotel on Saturday July 16 from 7.30pm.

The effort has paid off as kind-hearted folk raised more than £36,000 to ensure she could complete her treatment, which ended in March. During her time in America, Lee and their sons George, 13, and Charlie, 11, flew out to see her.

As a result of the treatment, her cancer markers have reduced.

Bev is keen to show that alternative therapy is viable alternative to more traditional radiation treatment that most people experience, and has offered to talk to anyone going through the same ordeal as her.

“People don’t understand the term until they go through it. It isn’t a hippyish idea but one that’s based on diet and nutrition. It’s about what you’re putting in your body,” she said.

As part of her ongoing recovery, Bev is a strict vegan and only eats organic products free from additives and chemicals.

It was her brother Jonathan Fischer, 39, who first suggested looking at alternative treatments after his own experience in reducing his cholesterol levels through changing his diet.

Bev said: “I’m in awe of Jonathan, we’re a close knit family but cancer changes your entire outlook on life.

“Now that I’ve educated myself about what I put in my body, I’m eating healthily to survive.”

Jonathan is full of admiration for his sister and for everyone who has helped raise money for her treatment. He said: “I cannot thank people enough for their contribution, whether it was a penny or a pound.”

For tickets visit http://bevdransfield-efbevent.eventbrite.com.