Tram renovation on right track

NEW START: The old tram sheds some of which are being demolished and the rest renovated for industrial units. (d604b234)
NEW START: The old tram sheds some of which are being demolished and the rest renovated for industrial units. (d604b234)
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bulldozers have moved onto the site of the old tram station at Frost Hill – but parts of the historic building will be preserved and renovated to make eight new industrial units.

Demolition work at the building, which was originally a tram station and later became Heckmondwike’s bus depot, began a few weeks ago and should be completed soon.

Then the remaining buildings, including part of the original tramshed, will be modernised and the whole site made more attractive and safe for delivery wagons.

The site is owned by Dewsbury-based Anchor Carpets which contracted Heckmondwike builder Howard Cook to carry out the work and his staff have uncovered some of Spen’s past while carrying out the demolition.

“In one of the sheds we are renovating, under the concrete we found one of the pits where the mechanics would work underneath the trams, and also the track lines,” said Howard.

“You can also see the arches which the trams would go through to get into the sheds.

“The building has had several extensions over the years, and in one of them you can see they have used old tram lines as girders for the roof.

“It is part of Spen’s history and it’s nice that we’re able to bring part of the old shed back into modern use.

“Anchor Carpets no longer needed it as a warehouse and asked for ideas for the site. All credit to them because they could have just knocked it down but they want to reinvest in the area.

“The biggest problem in the past has been wagons backing into the site from the main road, and it’s also opposite Millbridge School.

“The design we’ve come up with will make it much more pleasant to look at as it will have a nice stone frontage, and there will be an internal road so that lorries can drive in easily and turn round on site making it much safer, especially for the schoolchildren.”