The expensive mistake which could see your driving licence costing you £1,000

The expensive mistake which could see your driving licence costing you £1,000
The expensive mistake which could see your driving licence costing you £1,000

Millions of motorists in the UK risk getting fined £1,000 due to a simple mistake on their driving license.

Under Section 99 of the Road Traffic Act 1988, you can be fined £1,000 if your driving license is not up to date.

This includes having an out of date photocard expiry date, your up-to-date address and your correct name.

A guide on moneysavingexpert.com explains that driving license photos must be replaced every 10 years.

Photocard licences replaced paper licences in 1998, and the DVLA says a huge 2.3 million photocards are out of date

It costs £14 to renew your photocard (£17 by post) and you can check if yours is out of date in section 4b on your driving license.

If you’ve recently moved or your address is otherwise inaccurate then you could also run the risk of the huge fine if you’re stopped by the police.

It’s free to update and you can do it as many times as you like.

Finally, you must have the correct name on your driving license.

Many people do not update their license details after getting married but this simple mistake could land you with a massive fine.

So, make sure your paperwork is up to date and save yourself a lot of money.

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